“Thousands of Job Visas Threatened”

Prior to 2007, the Immigration Department awarded qualification and work experience points based on inputs from Trades Recognition Australia (TRA) and recognized Professional Bodies. In 2007, it outsourced this activity to a “relevant authority” as appointed by the Workplace Minister, and amended the Migration Act accordingly.

This made little difference to the migration process as far as applicants were concerned except that the forms were a little different. Professional translation of foreign documents continued to be insisted upon. As far as our German NAATI Translators were concerned it was very much business as usual.

Unfortunately one thing was overlooked in Canberra. Nobody remembered that the Workplace Minister had to appoint the TRA as relevant authority before it could commence it task. As a consequence of this oversight, all foreign work visas issued during this period are based on an administratively invalid premise.

German English Australia Translation ServiceWe are inclined to regard this matter as a bureaucratic storm in a teacup. We can’t see the Australian Government taking the knock on the potential 130,000 lawsuits that might follow if it started cancelling visas. All our immigration translations were as always impeccably done too

The news only erupted after a visa applicant successfully overturned a Migration Review Tribunal decision to refuse a visa on the grounds that he’d given false information about his work experience. If general action were being contemplated, surely Workplace Minister Julia Gillard illustrated here would have announced this, when she corrected the blunder back in 2011.

Australia’s Oldest German Settlement

The town of Hahndorf is Australia’s oldest surviving German settlement. German immigrants known as Old Lutherans arrived there in 1839 to escape religious persecution in Prussia (Hahn was captain of the ship named Zebra they arrived on). They laid their settlement out in Hufendorf style, and were soon well known for their pious customs and zest for hard work – even though the lack of translators in Adelaide made them difficult for locals to understand.

These days, Hahndorf is easily found after a thirty-minute drive along the South Eastern Freeway from Adelaide. Notable attractions include traditional fachwerk half-timbered architecture, and St Michael’s Lutheran Church begun in 1839, and still home to a worshipful congregation.

From time to time the settlement was hit by schisms though. The breakaway St Paul’s Lutheran Church was established in 1846 when pastors Kavel and Fritsche experienced theological differences. German English Translations in AustraliaDuring World War One, the South Australia Government changed Hahndorf’s name to Ambleside. This was corrected in the 1930’s (although the replacement name is still seen in various places).

These days of course German migrants travelling to Australia have an easier time of it. They arrive on modern jet planes and have NAATI Translators to assist them with their documentation. They also no longer need to build half-timbered houses. In fact, Australian architecture is among the most modern in the world. .

Thanks, Wikipedia for the photo and Incidental Nomads for the welcome sign.

The Joys of Restaurant Menus

Translating restaurant menus requires the work of a professional translator. Unfortunately, restaurant owners usually are no big spenders, so when it comes to providing foreign-language versions of their menu to entice an international clientele, they often rely on Google translate or ask their counsin’s counsin’s cousin, who then uses Google translate.

The result is a menu that is really entertaining but doesn’t encourage you to spend money at this place. Another case where a certified translation (even if it not an immigration document!) could have made the world a better (and yummier) place….enjoy! 🙂

fishhead

wikipediaflavor

steamedcraps

“In Coleslaw” – Please

Translating can be edgy business – especially in commerce and marketing. Despite epic and well-known translation blunders such as “Nothing sucks like an Electrolux”, professionals (?) around the world still come up with new mix-ups every day. Have a look at this care label on a piece of Chinese clothing:

In ColeslawIf you decide on following these instructions, we recommend a side of mash for best effect. For a different approach, try potato salad instead. The good thing is, we guess, that you can wash your soiled clothes while still at the family BBQ or at KFC.

Or, as a friend’s granny used to say tongue-in-cheek: Grease stains on clothes last much longer if you rub butter into them twice a week.

But all joking aside, inferior translations are bad business. It’s worth spending the extra buck so that you don’t expose your business or yourself to such ridicule. As Australia’s leading immigration translator, we’re here to help.