Three Benefits of Translating E-Commerce Products

If you are thinking of marketing your products online to a global market it’s not worth the effort unless you translate the information about your products into the language of your proposed market. There are two main things you need to get your e-commerce products globally mobile, one is the translation of products and two is the localization of products. Before you can start with the localization which is getting both your website and your product to meet the global market you need to translate your product information first. This information can then be adapted to meet the requirements of localisation.

Benefits of Translating your e-commerce Products

1. More Sales than Non Translated Product

Before making a purchasing decision, 56 percent of potential e-commerce customers indicate that their first consideration is learning about the product in their own language. This is in fact more important than the price of the product. In the EU, when it comes to booking tours or hotels, 80 percent say that they must read the promotional material in their own language first before deciding to buy. This is the first reason for translating your website.

2.More Customer Loyalty through Translated Product

One of the things that ensures regular income for a business is customer loyalty. Once you have got a customer interested in your product because of your e-commerce product translation so they can understand it in their own language, they will go back to your site over and over again because they know what to expect. It’s loyalty that brings in consistent sales.

3.Better than your competitors

An e-commerce translation of your products puts you ahead of your competitors, which offers you a better chance of determining the price of your product. Your brand will begin to stand out in the international market if customers know your website is easy to understand and you are reliable. This information will likely be shared on social media sites so you can expect even better sales.

If you don’t translate your e-commerce products you can only expect to sell your products to those who understand the language of your website. Customers are savvy and won’t let go over money unless they are sure the product is what they really want. Appearance and language on your website that suits your intended customer puts you ahead of the rest and grows your business’s revenue.

Reasons Why we Really Did Need a New Translation of “The Odyssey”

Because Homer’s Odyssey has turned out to be such an influential work of Western literature, it has been translated at least 60 times from Greek to English. Emily Wilson has just published yet another Odyssey translation.

Why was this Translation Really Necessary?

Basically, Emily Wilson is the first female translator to translate this work into English. Who the translator is can make a great difference to the interpretation of a text. This is because often a translator’s own biases and beliefs can have at least some effect on the overall translation of something like the Odyssey. Wilson stated that the aim of the translation was to get out the truth of the content of the Odyssey.  She believes that there is a relationship between gender and translation, especially in something as ancient as the Odyssey, where there are links between when engaging poetry in translation.

Gender and its Relationship to Translation

In Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey where Odysseus demands the death penalty for all the slave girls who had slept with Penelope’s suitors, previous translations offer a different translation.  The girls are not referred to as slaves, but as “whores”, “sluts” and “creatures. Slavery was common in that era of ancient Greek history. Earlier translations of The Odyssey called them “maidservants.” In a New York Times report, Wilson says this idea is not only misleading but is not a literal translation either.

Wilson has aimed at the story being more accessible to today’s reader. It seems that her translation of certain aspects of the Odyssey may be upsetting to some; particularly in the way she has translated “polytropos,” the Greek word which is used at the start of the poem to describe Odysseus. “Polytropos” means literally “many turns” but earlier translators have chosen “sagacious” and “crafty” and a “man of twists and turns”. This shows how a poem interpretation is so dependent on whom the translator is.

Even though she may have added some freshness to some of the old fashioned language used in the original poem, she has managed to keep her version of the translation to the same number of lines that were used in the original Greek poem. She has also carefully replicated the rhythm of the original poem as well.

Some of the most difficult and contentious translations are those in the literature field because the original version of the text was created by someone who wanted to put across unique ideas.